Monday, May 13, 2019

RA21 doesn't address the yet-another-WAYF problem. Radical inclusiveness would.

The fundamental problem with standards is captured by XKCD 927.
XKCD https://xkcd.com/927/
Single sign-on systems have the same problem. The only way for a single sign-on system to deliver a seamless user experience is to be backed by a federated identity system that encompasses all use cases. For RA-21 to be the single button that works for everyone, it must be radically inclusive. It must accommodate a wide variety of communities and use cases.

Unfortunately, the draft recommended practice betrays no self-awareness about this problem. Mostly, it assumes that there will be a single "access through your institution" button. While it is certainly true that end-users have more success when presented with a primary access method, it's not addressed how  RA-21 might reach that state.

Articulating a radical inclusiveness principle would put the goal of single-button access within reach. Radical inclusiveness means bringing IP-based authentication, anonymous access, and access for walk-ins into the RA-21 tent. Meanwhile the usability and adoption of of SAML-based systems would be improved; service providers who require "end-to-end traceability" could achieve this in the context of their customer agreements; it needn't be a requirement for the system as a whole.

Radical inclusiveness would also broaden the user base and thus financial support for the system as a whole. We can't expect a 100,000 student university library in China to have the same requirements or capabilities as a small hospital in New Jersey or a multinational pharmaceutical company in Switzerland, even though all three might need access to the same research article.



This is my fourth comment on the RA-21 draft "Recommended Practices for Improved Access toInstitutionally-Provided Information Resources". The official comment period ends Friday. This comment, 57 others, and the add-comment form can be read here. My comments so far are about secure communication channelspotential phishing attacks, and the incompatibility of the recommended technical approach with privacy-enhancing browser features. I'm posting the comments here so you can easily comment. I'll have one more comment, and then a general summary.

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